‘I Cain’t Say No’ And Other Snippets From A British Songbird

While on a coast path walk from Padstow to Harlyn Bay yesterday, John and I walked past a farmer’s field where the hay for winter had been cut and baled. I commented on how unusual it is to see it in squares as it usually looks like the round mounds below.

I usually refer to these big round rolls of hay as ” Tess of the d’Uerbyvilles” after Thomas Hardy’s book by the same name. Whenever I spot them, I can almost see Nastassja Kinski dressed as Tess for the 1979 film version of the book called “Tess.”

John and I talk about a lot of topics when walking the coast path, but yesterday’s walk got a bit livelier when I remarked as we passed this fresh-cut field that it reminded me of Kansas. From there we moved on to Oklahoma landscapes and John seized the opportunity to launch into a chesty version the theme song for the Rogers and Hammerstein musical, Oklahoma! which he did very well.

When he paused for a breath, I said that I had used a song from that show for musical auditions in the past and he was off again singing, I Cain’t Say No in a scratchy falsetto complete with flirty gestures intended to make you think of the girlish Ado Annie.

Imagine if you can, a bearded Englishman stomping down the trail singing the lyrics below with good British diction. I was howling with laughter!

It ain’t so much a question of not knowing what to do.
I knowed what’s right and wrong since I was ten.
I heared a lot of stories and I reckon they are true
About how girls’re put upon by men.
I know I mustn’t fall into the pit,
But when I’m with a feller,
I fergit!
I’m just a girl who cain’t say no,
I’m in a terrible fix
I always say “come on, let’s go!”
Jist when I orta say nix…

Maybe next time I can get a bit of video.



What A Day!

Jubilee Rock – Bodmin Moor – My Girl

What a day, what a day, remember that check list of places and things I wanted to share with Miranda … here are a few images from yesterday.

Helland Bridge

Lavethan Wood   (Photograph by Miranda)

We also managed to take in a bit of the Camel Trail on foot and we walked through the buttercup field which is a little low on buttercups as it’s still early for them. Lunch was fish & chips at Rick Stein’s in Padstow, a meal and a port town we’ve been trying to get to all week and after a little sightseeing and shopping, we were off to an antique store in another town that I had mentioned earlier and she’d wanted to see.

Last stop was the library because it was that time again and after a quick trip to the pub where we had hoped to catch sight of some darling puppies, we headed for home where we finished off our day with a knitting lesson for me. Whew!

The best part of it all was we had a great time even though it was such a busy day. Miranda was both interested and a good sport as we went from place to place and at some point began to say, Helland Bridge … check, Camel Trail … check, Lavethan Wood  … check, but in a cute way that made me think she was glad to have a chance to see more of the places in person that I’ve been writing and talking about over the last two years.

I’m giving her a wake-up call in a few minutes because today’s another day and we’re off to see Stonehenge! Guess who’s driving

On Reflection


Only when the clamor of the outside world is silenced will you be able to hear the deeper vibration. Listen carefully.

~Sarah Ban Breathnach

I took the image above yesterday at the end of a run/walk with my friend Tina. Although the sky looks threatening in the photograph above, it was actually a lovely blue sky morning filled with magnificent images everywhere we looked. Tina was extremely patient as I stopped more times than I should have to snap a picture that I just couldn’t resist.

What began as a desire to work my body quickly shifted to an exercise in pausing to see what was all around me. I only need open my eyes in the morning to feel an enormous amount of gratitude for the beauty I have in my life and mornings like yesterday make me feel as if I’ve won the lottery. I’ve always been a cup half full rather than half empty kind of girl, but truly, if happiness could be poured into a glass then mine would be spilling over.

Here are a few more images from yesterday for your reflection today…a look at the world just outside my door.


I could see the tip top of the church through the morning mist as I was leaving to run so snapped this from the patio at the front of the house and decided to take my camera with me. These are presented in the order they were taken and are only a few of the 300 or so I snapped. The first four below are taken of the village green which is very close to the house where we live and usually makes me feel like we live in a park.






This house sits right next to a lovely ancient bridge called Key Bridge. It dates from the sixteenth century and has a granite sundial post on it from the seventeenth century. The De Lank River flows under it and it’s a favorite of mine.


A photo of the sundial post.



This made me think of a high rise building for some reason.


Public footpath signs can be found almost anywhere as Britain is a country where people are inclined to walk no matter how wet the weather or the age of the walker. It’s never surprising to see someone well into their 80s out for a stroll. I love the picturesque stiles that lead you to the next view like the one below of the cows in the field.



The Camel Trail is a great place to run, walk, or bike and connects us to several larger places such as Padstow, Wadebridge, and Bodmin. It feels much safer to me to ride a bike to these locations on the Camel than it does to dodge road traffic in the lanes.


We met a few runners and folks on bikes yesterday morning.


I always love this view…plus it is part of the home stretch.


There’s usually something hanging out in these fields as we pass through such as sheep, horses, or cows.


Almost home.



My new friend likes to follow me and sometimes he stops by to play hide ad seek in the garden with me.


He’s still a playful kitten and kept pawing at my camera whenever I would get too close.


I’ll finish with the same flower that was in the first photograph, but taken from a different angle illustrating how a shift in perspective can change what you see quite dramatically.