A Last Look Back

In the small village where John and I live I’m becoming known for almost always having a camera in hand and some people will actually comment if they see me without one. I don’t think it took our July 4th guests, Jamie and Barbara long to see that visiting us meant most moments were likely to be documented. Here’s a last look at a few more images I captured during their stay.

I was standing in the hallway at Lanhydrock shooting this image when Jamie walked by and I caught him looking at the mirror on the wall below.

That’s me in the reflection, but due to flash restrictions it’s a bit grainy from shooting in low light.

Barbara, Jamie and John walking towards the old caretakers cottage on the Lanhydrock property.

Barbara and Jamie standing at the signpost for the Rumps which we walked first and Port Quin which we walked later that afternoon. Please notice that the arrows point in opposite directions … we did a lot of walking that day.

Jamie set off at a good pace right behind John while I waited for Barbara who you can just make out in the right hand corner.

Not too steep yet …

Now this is a bit steeper. Can you see the ant-like figures of Jamie and Barbara in the center of the photograph? (click on it to enlarge)

More color from another direction.

The dragon looking piece of land in the center is known as The Rumps.

Barbara and Jamie take a seat near the Laurence Binyon memorial in front of The Rumps.

Here’s one of us sitting in the same spot.

A few of my favorite cuties or ” dinner ” as John would say.

Looking back from Polzeath in the direction of the Rumps.

The beach at Polzeath in the distance. (click to enlarge)

Cottage at Port Quin (click on to see the barking dog)

Looking back at Polzeath

John, Jamie, and Barbara on Jubilee Rock with what looks like a stormy sky behind them.

Notice the carvings on the rock … according to a site called, Oliver’s Cornwall ” The massive 8 foot high granite boulder was said to have been carved by Lt. John Rogers to celebrate the 1810 golden jubilee of King George III. If Rogers was the carver he must have been a skilled mason as the detail of all the work in still crisp after almost 200 years. All is apparently original except for an 1897 addition for Victoria’s golden jubilee. Detail includes Britannia, the Royal and Cornish coats of arms and those of local families, a plough, and two mason’s marks, a compass and square.”

The whole of the rock is covered in carvings including the top where they’re standing.

This cool picture of them is one of John’s photographs and was taken from the top and backside of the Jubilee Rock.

No trip to our little village is complete without a quick visit to the buttercup field (even though there are few buttercups left in July) and a photo at the footbridge that crosses the water and leads to it. So we’re saying goodbye here to Jamie and Barbara and hoping that the rest of their UK visit goes well. Safe travels.

Coast Path Walking In October- Port Quin To Port Isaac

The weather here was stunning on Saturday so John and I set out to do a little coast path walking. I sometimes forget how close we are to the sea and I’m still a little surprised when I hear seagulls right outside our door. One of the closest coastal locations is Port Quin, which is about ten miles from us. I thought you might like a Monday distraction to go with your coffee or tea break depending on the part of the world you call home. These appear in the order of our journey. I hope you enjoy the walk.


This sign tells us that we are close, but we’re not driving to Port Isaac, we are walking in, so we veer to the left and head down to a parking spot in Port Quin.


Taking the left towards Port Quin.


Port Quin as you see above is tiny. There’s not much there anymore, but what is still there is lovely. It used to be a thriving fishing village until something happened that changed everything. It’s worth going here to find out why.


You pick up the path to Port Isaac here going between the old cottages leading up and out of Port Quin.



Almost immediately you begin to see amazing views.



A shot of me wearing my Tilley hiking hat and carrying my Canon Powershot G9.


I’m dragging along behind John taking pictures of almost everything. Can you see me down there?  All along the fence, there were spiderwebs with no spiders. I must have passed 30 or 40 empty webs like the one below.



In the photos above and below you can see a series of steps that go straight up or down if you’re lucky.



I was amazed to see how many flowers were still blooming along the path.


John takes a break so I can snag a photo.


This was the view he was seeing from where he was sitting in the photo above.


More flowers in October…growing wild.


Our approach to Port Isaac as seen from above.


This bee impressed me with his pollen boots.


Viewing the harbor from Port Isaac.


John heading back to Port Quin.


Again…honeysuckle flowers in October. I always thought of these as a flower for spring.


Returning to Port Quin…coming back by what I think of as the back way.

Remember to stop by tomorrow for Tell Me A Story Tuesday. If you’d like to participate in TMAST, go here to see the pictures and choose a topic sentence. Post your story on your blog and let me know so I can link it here.

Walking The Coast Path With Cows And Caution-No Bullies Allowed

The title for this post takes its name in part from an email I received from a coast path walker who found my blog through some of my previous posts about walking the Cornish coast path. I hope she won’t mind my ” borrowing” a part of her email subject heading for my post today.

Yesterday John and I headed out to find a bit of adventure along with some fresh air and exercise. I’ve been doing a lot of computer work lately (editing wedding pictures) and the weather was too nice to stay inside. Additionally, even though I’ve been back since May 25, it was our first walk along the coast since I’d gone back to America in late April. John suggested a short walk from Port Quin to Port Isaac both of which are about ten miles from where we live. After packing up a P B & J for me and some fruit for him…we were off. 

It was beautiful as it always is and I promise I’ll include a few pictures near the water, but my main reason for this post is to have a little talk about the cows and bullocks we encountered so walk with me now….


Sometimes on our walks we have to walk through fields that are already occupied.




Me saying hello…this one was quite happy to let me touch him on the nose before moving along with his buddies.

The question came up from one of my readers as to the safety in crossing though these places where the public footpath herds (sorry, I couldn’t help myself) you right in with the big animals.  I told her I’d never encountered any problems and then she recounted how she and her family had a bunch of cows come charging across the field startling her, her husband, and their children. In the past I naively thought cows and bullocks were just happy to see me whenever I saw a herd of them shift direction and move in mass at a clip towards me.


John said if they ever look scary to just say boo and throw your arms out at them.  He demonstrated this technique below without warning me so you can’t see the hand motions. ( I missed it)


A couple of guys trying to look tough…”Whadaya mean you want to pass through us?”


John approaching the bad boy brothers just moments before saying BOO!


After they’d scattered …giving him some sulky looks.


This one did not look amused either.


This brown one was pretty interested in me however… deciding that I might be worth investigating further.


Right!  Now I’m usually okay with a nudge but I think I really must draw the line when it comes to taste testing.  John was getting his camera out here while I was trying to capture this beastie licking my arm.



For the record…cow tongues are rough, slimy and strong.  


All joking aside, when I mentioned to John what my reader Sarah had said in an email to me about cows and safety on the path he said…people are usually quite safe and that cows are more curious as you can see above than dangerous. He did go on to say that they will get angry when dogs are around especially if they have calves with them.  An incident was in the news here recently that illustrated this when David Blunkett, a prominent politician in the UK who is blind was out walking with his guide dog and was trampled by a cow who was trying to get to the dog. So I’d say caution is key when passing by these gentle seeming two ton Toms and Tessies. ( Okay maybe one ton not two, but it worked better).

Wrapping up the walk from yesterday…as I was taking this picture.


John was climbing up and over here.


Then while I was trying to get a decent closeup of these drying flower heads below….


John slipped back and stuck his head through a gap in the wall and began to make woo woo scary moaning sounds as I approached the fence and started to climb over.  Going back I saw this….



On  the other side…you can actually walk down to the water…no one’s stopping you.


Back on the path

Port Isaac

Port Isaac from above.   We had a little pub stop for a pint and a coffee and walked back to Port Quin totally ignored by the cows who’d lost all interest in us by late afternoon.  

NEXT TIME: Celebrity spotting in Cornwall.

I’ll be back with my experience with celebrity spotting yesterday in the supermarket. We were actually side by side scanning the parking lot for our cars after stepping out of the store at the same time. 

Here’s a hint…there’s a TV show that uses Port Isaac as its location, but with a name change. The man I almost  bumped  into is a regular character on the show although not the male lead. He’s associated with a trade profession in the show…anybody want to venture a guess?